From fireworks restrictions to abortion access, here’s the week in review | Five for the Weekend

Here are some headlines you might have missed this week.

By: - July 2, 2022 6:30 am

Happy weekend, all. 

With much of the focus over the past week centered on passing a state budget for the 2022-23 Fiscal Year, here are some headlines you might have missed while trying to keep up with, well, everything else.

Reproductive Health Care

On Wednesday, New Jersey passed legislation that would ban the extradition of people who get or perform abortions in New Jersey to states that criminalize the procedure.

Noteworthy:

Roe’s reversal has healthcare implications for LGBTQ community

Biden says he supports filibuster exception for abortion rights legislation

U.S. HHS chief vows to protect abortion access, but says much depends on states

In the Legislature

On Monday, state Sen. and Republican nominee for governor Doug Mastriano advocated for a bill that would establish mandatory minimum sentences for anyone convicted of selling Fentanyl that results in death.

Noteworthy:

Pa. Senate approves veto-bound legislation targeting transgender girls, women in school sports

Senate approves limits on ‘sexually explicit’ content, gender identity discussions in schools

House adopts resolution to investigate Philly DA Krasner over objections of city lawmakers

Pa. Senate approves bill restricting fireworks

As always, the top five stories from this week are below.

Hundreds of protesters rally in Harrisburg on Saturday, May 14, 2022, to promote abortion access. (Capital-Star photo by Marley Parish)

1. Abortion is still legal in Pennsylvania. What to know about existing requirements, access

For now, the Abortion Control Act, a 1982 state law, permits abortions with some restrictions and requirements.

More than 32,000 people received legal abortions in 2020, according to data from the state Department of Health, which is required by law to report details on abortion services. Pennsylvania has collected data on the procedure since 1975.

The Capital-Star spoke with Planned Parenthood Keystone President and CEO Melissa Reed about getting a legal induced abortion in Pennsylvania and what to expect at an appointment.

A view of the front portico of the United States Supreme Court building in Washington, DC.

2. U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade. What does that mean in Pennsylvania?

The U.S. Supreme Court — with a conservative majority — on Friday ruled in favor of a Mississippi law directly challenging the landmark Roe v. Wade decision by making most abortions illegal after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

The decision, written by Justice Samuel Alito, is the highest court’s most consequential decision on abortion rights in decades, leaving decisions about abortion and its legality up to states.

“The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives,” Alito wrote in the opinion.

Charlie Gerow (Courtesy of campaign)

3. Trump’s fake electors: Here’s the full list

The 84 people who signed bogus documents claiming that Donald Trump won the 2020 election include dozens of local Republican Party leaders, seven current candidates for public office, eight current office holders and at least five previous state and federal office holders.

Groups from ArizonaGeorgiaMichiganNew Mexico, NevadaPennsylvania and Wisconsin all allegedly sent lists of so-called alternate electors to the National Archives after the 2020 election. The slate of fake electors includes Lou Barletta and Charlie Gerow, both candidates for governor in Pennsylvania; Burt Jones, a candidate for lieutenant governor in Georgia; James Lamon, a candidate for U.S. Senate from Arizona; and candidates for state legislative seats.

State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin (R) and former state Rep. Rick Saccone at the U.S. Capitol on 1/6/21 (Facebook photo)

4. Democratic Governors Association calls on Mastriano to release potential Jan. 6 footage

A national group dedicated to electing Democratic governors is pressuring Pennsylvania’s Republican nominee for governor to turn over any video footage he may have recorded while in Washington, D.C. on the day of the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

The Democratic Governors Association, citing a photo recently unearthed of Mastriano in Washington on Jan. 6, called on him to release any photos or video he may have taken while on the Capitol grounds. The screenshot referenced by the organization appears to show Mastriano taking photos or video with his cellphone as supporters of former President Donald Trump began to storm the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

Hundreds of protestors rally in Harrisburg on Saturday, May 14, 2022, to promote abortion access. (Capital-Star photo by Marley Parish)

5. Here’s how Pa. politicians reacted to the U.S. Supreme Court’s abortion decision

The U.S. Supreme Court — with a conservative majority — on Friday ruled in favor of a Mississippi law directly challenging the landmark Roe v. Wade decision by making most abortions illegal after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

The decision, written by Justice Samuel Alito, is the highest court’s most consequential decision on abortion rights in decades, leaving decisions about abortion and its legality up to states.

“The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives,” Alito wrote in the opinion.

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