Dickinson alum underwrites scholarship for 5 Ukrainian students | Five for the Weekend

The $2M gift will provide full tuition scholarships to the liberal arts college

By: - March 18, 2023 6:30 am
A Ukrainian student gets the good news about their scholarship (YouTube screen capture/Dickinson College).

A Ukrainian student gets the good news about their scholarship (YouTube screen capture/Dickinson College).

Happy Weekend, All

It’s Capital-Star Editor John L. Micek, in for Cassie Miller this week, who’s taking a bit of time off.

We’re going out this week with a dose of good news that should serve as an antidote to the tales of woe and destruction that too often dominate the headlines.

Thanks to the largess of an alumnus, five students from war-torn Ukraine are now the beneficiaries of full-tuition scholarships to Dickinson College in Carlisle, Cumberland County, the college announced this week.

In addition to tuition covering all four years, the $2 million gift from graduate Sam Rose, Class of 1958will cover the costs of textbooks, dining and living expenses including support for travel, health insurance and other basic needs through the academic year in addition to support during the college’s summer and winter breaks, the college said in a statement.

An aerial view of the campus of Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa. (Dickinson College photo).
An aerial view of the campus of Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa. (Dickinson College photo).

The students also will be provided with mentorship and internship opportunities through the gift, the college said.

Dickinson President John E. Jones III, who called the students to let them know about the gift, said it’s “critical that we welcome international perspectives, and we are excited to meet and learn from our new Ukrainian students, who will help us build a more interesting and engaging campus community.”

Rose, whose maternal grandmother was born in Kyiv, said the gift was a “great place to make an investment.

“These students have endured more than a year of war in their homeland, and I’m happy to give them the opportunity to succeed with a life-changing Dickinson education to become leaders and problem-solvers,” he said.

As always, our usual rundown of your Top 5 most-read stories starts below. 

Republican U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado speaks during a debate against Republican Colorado state Sen. Don Coram at the Sky Ute Resort and Casino in Ignacio on May 26, 2022. (William Woody for Colorado Newsline)Republican U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado speaks during a debate against Republican Colorado state Sen. Don Coram at the Sky Ute Resort and Casino in Ignacio on May 26, 2022. (William Woody for Colorado Newsline)

1. Boebert’s remarks about rural teen pregnancies dodge a deeper truth | Heather MacDonald

U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., announced last week that, at the age of 36, she was preparing to become a grandmother.

Her 17-year-old son and his teenage girlfriend are set to have a baby in April. Boebert used the announcement as an opportunity to display a stunning level of hypocrisy by praising teenage pregnancy as proof that conservatives understand the value of life.

“…Teen mom rates are higher in rural conservative areas because we understand the preciousness of the life that is about to be born,” she a crowd at last week’s Conservative Political Action Conference.

Former U.S. President Donald Trump gestures during an event at his Mar-a-Lago home on Nov. 15, 2022 in Palm Beach, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Former U.S. President Donald Trump gestures during an event at his Mar-a-Lago home on November 15, 2022 in Palm Beach, Florida. Trump announced that he was seeking another term in office and officially launched his 2024 presidential campaign. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

2. What happens if Trump is charged or convicted because of Jan. 6 referrals? | Opinion

The criminal referral of Donald Trump to the Department of Justice by a House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack is largely symbolic – the panel itself has no power to prosecute any individual.

Nonetheless, the recommendation that Trump be investigated for four potential crimes – obstructing an official proceeding; conspiracy to defraud the United States; conspiracy to make a false statement; and inciting, assisting or aiding or comforting an insurrection – raises the prospect of an indictment, or even a conviction, of the former president.

It also poses serious ethical questions, given that Trump has already announced a 2024 run for the presidency, especially in regards to the referral over his alleged inciting or assisting an insurrection. Indeed, a Department of Justice investigation over Trump’s activities during the insurrection is already under way.

But would an indictment – or even a felony conviction – prevent a presidential candidate from running or serving in office?

State Rep. Seth Grove, the ranking Republican member of the House Appropriations Committee, speaks during a committee meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2023 (Capital-Star file).
State Rep. Seth Grove, the ranking Republican member of the House Appropriations Committee, speaks during a committee meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2023 (Capital-Star file).

3. Pa. House GOP leader warns Gov. Shapiro’s budget proposal will lead to massive deficit

Pennsylvania would have a massive budget deficit within three years under Gov. Josh Shapiro’s proposed 2023-24 budget, the ranking Republican member of the state House Appropriations Committee said Wednesday.

Rep. Seth Grove, of York County, outlined House Republicans’ priorities in upcoming budget negotiations and hearings in a news conference where he said Shapiro’s budget plan obscures growth in spending – and uses an overly optimistic estimate for expenditures in coming years.

Shapiro’s $44.4 billion spending plan masks a structural deficit by drawing more than $2 billion from the state’s nearly $6 billion surplus, Grove said.

That continues a practice in place since former GOP Gov. Tom Corbett’s administration, Grove said, of using windfalls, such as the state’s share of tobacco settlement funds, to balance the budget.

Penn Law professor Amy Wax (University of Pennsylvania photo)
Penn Law professor Amy Wax (University of Pennsylvania photo)

4. Penn law professor faces evaluation by peers for ‘racist speech’

PHILADELPHIA — New accusations of “inappropriate conduct” against University of Pennsylvania law professor Amy Wax were outlined recently in a 12-page letter to the school’s Faculty Senate by law school Dean Ted Ruger. He is requesting that the Senate levy a “major sanction” against Wax.

In the June 23 letter, Ruger said “Wax has repeatedly used the platform she was granted when she became a professor … to disparage immigrants, people of color, and women, including law students, alumni, and faculty.”

The letter states that “although imposing sanctions on a faculty member of the University of Pennsylvania is a ‘rare event,’” Wax’s conduct deserves a “major sanction against her.” The major sanction means that Wax could be suspended or fired.

(Source: Anti-Defamation League)

5. Pa. among top states for white supremacist propaganda in 2022 | Tuesday Morning Coffee

White supremacist propaganda hit an all-time high in 2022, with Pennsylvania among the national leaders, even as antisemitic propaganda more than doubled from the year before, according to a new report by the Anti-Defamation League.

The Keystone State accounted for 413 of the 6,751 incidents the ADL tallied in 2022, up from the 4,876 incidents the civil rights organization tracked nationwide in 2021. That’s a 38% year-over-year increase nationwide, according to the report.

“Propaganda campaigns allow white supremacists to maximize media and online attention for their groups and messaging while limiting the risk of individual exposure, negative media coverage, arrests and public backlash that often accompanies more public activities,” the report’s authors wrote. “Propaganda, which affects entire communities, allows a small number of people to have an outsized impact.”

According to the ADL, the Texas-based Patriot Front was responsible for the majority of the white supremacist propaganda that was distributed nationwide last year. The group was active in every state, except for Alaska and Hawaii, but was most active (in order) in Massachusetts, Texas, Michigan, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Utah, according to the ADL.

And that’s the week. Have a great weekend. We’ll see you all back here on Monday.

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John L. Micek

A three-decade veteran of the news business, John L. Micek is the Pennsylvania Capital-Star's former Editor-in-Chief.

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