The Lead

Zelenskyy reminds Congress of Pearl Harbor and 9/11 in pleading for U.S. help for Ukraine

By: and - March 16, 2022 11:44 am

A demonstrator holds the Ukrainian flag at the Pennsylvania Capitol during a protest on Saturday, Feb. 26, 2022 (Capital-Star photo).

Maine Sen. Angus King told reporters afterward there was a “collective holding of the breath” in the room and “the fact that he concluded his speech in English was a very powerful moment.”

Biden announces more military aid

Several hours after the address, President Joe Biden announced $800 million in additional U.S. military assistance to Ukraine, saying that he listened to Zelenskyy’s “convincing” speech from the White House private residence.

“He speaks for people who have shown remarkable courage and strength in the face of brutal aggression — courage and strength that’s inspired not only Ukrainians, but the entire world,” Biden said.

Despite Democrats and Republicans alike commending Zelenskyy for his speech and his actions in Ukraine, it wasn’t immediately clear if the United States would shift its stance on the no-fly zone.

Despite Democrats and Republicans alike commending Zelenskyy for his speech and his actions in Ukraine, it wasn’t immediately clear if the United States would shift its stance on the no-fly zone.

Taking to Twitter, U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, D-Pa., said Zelenskyy “spoke clearly and eloquently about Putin’s brutality and outlined the support he needs from the world. The United States stands by the Ukrainian people and we will work with our allies to support their needs.”

U.S. Sen. Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla., called for sending planes and adding economic deterrents.

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Jennifer Shutt
Jennifer Shutt

Jennifer covers the nation’s capital as a senior reporter for States Newsroom. Her coverage areas include congressional policy, politics and legal challenges with a focus on health care, unemployment, housing and aid to families.

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Jacob Fischler
Jacob Fischler

Jacob covers federal policy and helps direct national coverage as deputy Washington bureau chief for States Newsroom. Based in Oregon, he focuses on Western issues. His coverage areas include climate, energy development, public lands and infrastructure.

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